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Being Tibetan in the West: How much to adapt, How much to not adapt

On Wednesday 3rd May 2017, I joined with two former Tibetan MPs from North America and Europe on a Live TV Talk show hosted by anchor Namgyal Shastri (who is also a former Tibetan MP) on the Voice of America (VOA) Tibetan language programme from their London News Centre. The Live programme runs from 3pm to 4pm on Wednesdays and Fridays with news bulletin for the first 20 mins or so.

The key topics for this talk show: ‘Being Tibetan in the West: How much to adapt, How much to not adapt’.

It is predicted that soon about half of the current Tibetan population in exile is expected to be based in western countries, outside the Indian sub-continent (excluding Tibet and China).

Currently, there are about 150,000 Tibetans in Exile, scattered across some 25 countries. India is the main base for Tibetans in Exile, followed by Nepal. The Tibetan Government in Exile is based in Dharamsala, northern India.

In the past two decades or so, an increasing number of Tibetans have chosen western countries as their new adopted ‘homes’. Whilst educated Tibetans seek to secure better opportunities for their children the challenges lay ahead in maintaining their rich cultural heritage in western societies, which has become an issue.

Efforts are being made by Tibetan communities in these countries to address this issue…

Tsering Passang

(London, 4 May 2017)

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About Tsering Passang (Tsamtruk)

Born in a refugee camp in western Nepal, Tsering is passionate about Tibet and the Tibetan issue. An NGO professional with combined experience of over 22 years, Tsering has led the Tibetan Community UK from 2014 to 2016 as its Chairman. He continues to engage in a wide-range of issues in support of the Tibetan aspirations. Prior to his current appointment as Special Adviser to the Tibet Society, which is the first and longest established Tibet support group anywhere in the world, Tsering has worked for Tibet Relief Fund and Tibet Foundation. He has also served on the boards of Tibetan Refugee Charitable Trust, Tibet Society and Tibet House Trust. A firm believer in making difference to his community, Tsering invests in the empowerment of youth and vulnerable individuals through development and advocacy work. He has conducted multiple field trips to India and Nepal over the past two decades and worked with professionals and local partners. A keen observer on China's global ambitions, Tsering follows its actions particularly policy implications on the Tibetan people across the Himalayan belt and beyond. As well as advocating on the Tibetan issue with the UN, EU and the UK through the parliamentarians, officials and special advisers, Tsering has spoken at important public and closed forums – audience included government representatives, policymakers, rights advocates, lawyers, journalists, NGO professionals, university students and researchers. In addition to his writings on the Tibetan affairs, published in the British, Nepalese and Tibetan media, Tsering was also interviewed by the BBC, Sky News and Reuters. He is frequently interviewed by the Voice of America, Radio Free Asia and Voice of Tibet. Tsering has also conducted special interviews with leading Tibetan political figures - President of the Tibetan Government-in-exile (Central Tibetan Administration) and His Holiness the Dalai Lama's former Special Envoy (Washington based) and former Representative (London based) for a Tibetan YouTube channel. Tsering’s personal blog: tsamtruk.wordpress.com

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